Tag Archives: Satellite Tag

Border Reiver is MIA

If you think that you have read this information previously you are correct; only the name of the bird has changed. The remaining information is another example of business as usual as another Hen Harrier disappears without trace on or near a grouse moor in Northern England. This report refers to the 4th Hen Harrier to join the ranks of the ‘disappeared’ this year, and it has not ended yet.

In summer of this year a female Hen Harrier called Reiver fledged from a nest on Langholm Moor in southern Scotland. Prior to fledging RSPB staff fitted her with a satellite tag as part of a long-standing project monitoring the movement and fate of the birds post fledging. The tags used in this project are extremely reliable and rarely fail as a result of faulty equipment. In fact, they are so reliable that they continue to work after a bird dies of natural causes, enabling researchers to locate the body. Having successfully fledged and strengthened her powerful flight muscles she made what would prove to be a fatal mistake; she crossed the border and entered English airspace. From that moment on her fate was sealed. This was one ‘Border Reiver’ that would not be returning home.

Initially Reiver’s tag functioned as expected providing technical data, together with her location and confirmation that she was in good health. Whilst the technical data and health indicators were welcome news her location gave cause for concern. Previously Hen Harriers had disappeared without trace in the same general area. In 2019 a Hen Harrier called Ada sent her last transmission to the satellite from a grouse moor east of Allendale Town. At the end of February this year Tarras, a bird that also fledged from Langholm, was never heard from again when contact with her was lost suddenly and inexplicably near Rowfoot, Northumberland.

On 17 September RSPB researchers pronounced that Reiver’s tag had ‘stopped, no malfunction’. Those 3 words may sound like a description of a technical failure, however that is far from the case. In fact, they are a euphemism for – the bird has been killed and we can’t find the body. Reiver disappeared without trace less than 5 kilometres from the area where Tarras also disappeared. A coincidence, or organised crime?

In addition to the 3 birds that have joined the ‘disappeared’ in Northumberland, Yarrow, a bird satellite tagged in 2020, disappeared in April. The satellite data from the last contact with Yarrow revealed that the flight path put her on a trajectory that would take her to the grouse moors of the North York Moors; a raptor persecution hotspot.

Four Hen Harriers are named in this article; Ada, Yarrow, Tarras and Reiver. They all disappeared in similar circumstances this year; never to be seen or heard of again. Even the most naïve nature lover would not accept that the disappearance of these 4 birds was a coincidence; and they would be correct to avoid that trap. Analysis of data from both the RSPB tagged birds and the data from birds tagged by Natural England unequivocally indicate that when Hen Harriers suffer from a satellite tag catastrophic failure / stop no malfunction on or near a grouse moor the most likely cause of the failure was that the bird was killed and the tag was destroyed. The common denominator in these cases, and countless others, is land managed for grouse shooting. It is long past the time when the Government stopped tinkering at the edges and got a grip on the Hen Harrier persecution problem. It will take more than declaring raptor persecution a wildlife crime priority, continuing with Brood Management and the ludicrous southern re-introduction scheme, if it ever happens, to resolve the raptor persecution problem on grouse moors. NERF has been calling for the licencing of grouse moors for several years and whilst it may not prevent all raptor related crimes in the uplands it will be a huge step to achieving that goal. Drafting legislation, which would include the suspension of a licence to operate a shoot, is not difficult; it just needs the political will to get on with it. Therein lies the problem; the Government does not have the political will to take any meaningful action to prevent raptor persecution. There are no ‘sunlit uplands’ for birds of prey in the North of England Prime Minister; in this part of the country the uplands are killing fields. The current situation is unsustainable; urgent action is needed to tackle this pernicious situation and it needs taking now.

We are only able to discuss the disappearance of these 4 birds because they were fitted with satellite tags by the RSPB; without those tags we would be totally unaware of the fate of these individuals. Whilst we can collectively mourn the loss of these 4 it is inconceivable to think that untagged Hen Harriers have not been killed this year in the same or similar locations.

Now that is a truly frightening thought; but it does go a long way to explain why the English breeding population remains perilously low. Unfortunately; the population will remain in a critical condition until persecution is ended and there is a very long way to go before that happens despite what the shooting industry would have us believe.

If you have any information relating to the disappearance of Reiver please contact Northumbria Police on 101 quoting reference NP-20210920-0837.

Alternatively, if you have information in respect of any bird related crime please contact the RSPB’s confidential hotline on 0300 999 0101

You can also pass information to the Police anonymously via Crimestoppers on 0800 555111

NERF

18 October 2021

Hen Harrier Fund Raiser

The Nidderdale Raptor Study Group in collaboration with the Northern England Raptor Forum are proud to bring you this exciting fund raising opportunity to raise money for the RSPB Investigations Team to purchase satellite tags to be fitted to Hen Harriers.

Hen Harrier Tag Fitted

The Hen Harrier, Circus cyaneus, is the UK’s most persecuted Bird of Prey. Previously driven to extinction as a breeding species in England the population is struggling to make a widespread come-back. The population remains perilously small and persecution on land managed for driven grouse shooting continues to be the primary factor limiting both population growth and expansion.

In a scientific paper published by Murgatroyd et al, using data from Natural England’s Hen Harrier Recovery Project, the authors revealed that the likelihood of Hen Harriers dying, or disappearing, was ten times higher within landscapes predominantly covered by grouse moor, compared to areas with no grouse moor. The study also revealed that 72% of tagged harriers were either confirmed or considered very likely to have been illegally killed.

Satellite Tag with harness

For the past 10 years the RSPB has been monitoring Hen Harriers, firstly within the Skydancer Project and latterly as part of the Hen Harrier Life Plus Project. In both projects satellite tags were fitted to nestlings during the breeding season by highly trained specialists. The solar powered tags, weighing 9.5 grams, are fitted to the birds by a harness that resembles a backpack. Once activated the tags are exceptionally reliable and provide data that allows the RSPB Investigations Team to accurately track the bird’s                                                                                                                movements daily.

The satellite tag also provides the ornithologists with data about how much solar generated voltage the tag has available and also information regarding the bird’s mobility and temperature. When analysed in conjunction with one another it can tell us whether the bird is dead or alive.

By carefully analysing all the data it is possible to determine the most probable reason why an individual bird appears to have stopped moving. Obviously, the bird may have died of natural causes or been predated. In the event that the tag suddenly and without prior warning fails to communicate with the satellites overhead, within a predicted time frame, a situation frequently referred to as ‘stop no malfunction’ , the most likely reason is that the bird has been killed.

In both scenarios a thorough ground search is conducted by the RSPB Investigations Team in the area of the last known location of the bird using very sophisticated equipment. In cases where the satellite data indicates that the bird probably died of natural causes the dead bird is invariably located. In contrast when the tag inexplicably ‘stops no malfunction’ the dead birds are rarely located, a further indication that the bird was illegally killed and the tag destroyed.

Whilst the RSPB data has yet to be published [the scientific papers are being completed at the moment] by reading the high volume of press statements released by the RSPB over the life time of both projects, it is not unreasonable to assume that analysis of the satellite data will provide another damning indictment of the grouse shooting industry.

In addition to highlighting regions of high levels of persecution the satellite date also identifies previously unknown winter roosting areas. There is a saying amongst Hen Harrier workers – ‘Harriers bring Harriers’. By following the satellite tagged Harriers we are able to count the untagged birds that are also using the winter roosts, some of which were previously unknown prior to the development of satellite tags. That in turn allows researchers to better understand how Hen Harriers occupy the landscape across the northern uplands over winter. Using all of this data the statisticians are able to model the autumn / winter population more accurately.

Using the modelled winter population data and comparing it with the known breeding population gives us a better understanding of how the population is prospering overall year on year. This information can be used by the RSPB and other conservation NGOs to lobby Government to change legislation to better protect this extremely vulnerable species from disturbance during the autumn / winter roosting season.

Map showing Apollo’s’ journey

Raptor workers have long suspected / known that the UK hosts Hen Harriers from Scotland and the near continent during the autumn and winter. The use of satellite tags has now confirmed that ‘English Hen Harriers’ also travel vast distances to over winter hundreds of miles from their breeding sites. This satellite track indicates the movements of a bird that was originally tagged in the Forest of Bowland in 2019. The bird returned to Bowland earlier this year and is now back in Spain. Sharing this data with our European partners enables them to monitor the bird over-winter on our behalf and to potentially locate unknown local roosts, in much the same way that the RSPB Investigations Teams do in the UK.

The use of satellite tags has already delivered a tremendous amount of new data confirming the continuing high level of persecution on land managed for driven grouse shooting. Additionally the data has highlighted the remarkable mobility of Hen Harriers outside of the breeding season. However, there is still much to learn about these magnificent birds and the continued deployment of satellite tags is vital to achieving this goal.

Artist Dan Evans

Dan Evans, a Yorkshire-based artist, has kindly chosen to create an A2-sized oil painting of a male Hen Harrier, which has been donated to the Nidderdale Raptor Study Group for an online auction; all proceeds will go to RSPB Investigations to fund satellite tags for Hen Harriers. The painting was inspired after Dan had spent time with members of the Raptor Study Group monitoring Hen Harriers locally. This is a unique opportunity to acquire the original spectacular painting. To place your bid for the painting please click this link to the auction.

https://danevans.art/hen-harrier

Hen Harrier Oil Painting
Click the links to bid on the original or to purchase prints

In addition to the auction, a limited number of signed prints will be available. The price of these are £50+p+p (A3) and £80+p+p (A2). Click here for details:

https://danevans.art/shop/p/l5wlw125yctk1qr7k99vvjl9tqs5i9

 

 

 

Once again all profits from the prints will go to fund satellite tags through the RSPB Investigations Team.

We appreciate that these are extraordinarily challenging times and not everyone who would like to buy a print will be in a position to do so but still want to support the project. To ensure that you have the opportunity to contribute to this invaluable scheme, on any level, we have created a ‘Justgiving’ fundraising webpage. If you would like to help us donate satellite tags to the RSPB Investigations Team please visit:

https://www.justgiving.com/fundraising/hen-harrier-sat-tags

We would like to thank you in advance for supporting this scheme; a scheme that will be of tremendous benefit to Hen Harriers by increasing their level of protection and also by revealing invaluable data about how they move through, and use, their natural environment throughout the year. We would be grateful if you could circulate the details of the project as far and wide as possible.

In the meantime we would like to wish you and your families a Happy Christmas and a peaceful and fulfilling New Year.

Stay well and stay safe.

NERF

1 December 2020.

Is the Red Kite named ‘KK’ Covid – 19 collateral damage?

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

On Friday 17 April 2020 the Red Kite ‘KK’ joined the long list of raptors that have ‘disappeared’– on a grouse moor.

In June 2019 NERF members, the Friends of Red Kites [FoRK] based in the North East of England, arranged for a Red Kite chick to be fitted with a satellite tracking device. The chick was named ‘KK’ in tribute to one the FoRK volunteers. The bird was also fitted with wing tags bearing the ID number 00, one of which can be seen in the photograph. After the tag was fitted the data it provided was monitored and mapped by the RSPB.

Red Kites are extremely placid birds of prey, a delight to handle as chicks and a beautiful graceful bird to watch gliding across open country. They are largely carrion feeders, scavenging on dead animals, cleaning up the countryside. They do not pose a threat to the shooting industry and yet in some quarters they are vilified for the sole reason that they a member of the raptor family.

During the remainder of 2019 KK toured the North of England as far south as the Peak District before returning to the Derwent Valley, Tyne & Wear.

In common with our extensive experience of other satellite tagged birds, KK’s life followed a pattern that we have seen with all too regularly. The tag worked perfectly and then without the warning signs that we would expect to see from a tag that is nearing its natural end of life the transmission suddenly and inexplicably stopped.

That the last fix, prior to the ‘stop no malfunction’ located the bird on a grouse moor near the Derwent Reservoir, in County Durham. Despite an extensive ground search being carried out by a very experienced team, using sophisticated equipment, the body was not found. These facts will not come as a surprise to those of us who follow these cases closely. Natural England’s Hen Harrier data reveals that satellite tagged birds are 10 times more likely to ‘disappear’ when the tag fails without warning when the bird was on a grouse moor at the time [Murgatroyd et al]. Data already in the public domain indicates that Hen Harrier chicks satellite tagged as part of the RSPB’s Hen Harrier Life Project reveal a similar pattern.

This is not the first Red Kite to ‘disappear’ in the Derwent Gorge area and the quote from Harold Dobson, spokesman for the Friends of the Red Kites, tell us all we need to know:

“Since 2010, seven red kites have been found poisoned or shot near the Derwent Gorge and surrounding Durham Moorland. We fear that this may be the tip of the iceberg and that many more persecuted kites are never found.”

David Raw representing NERF member, the Durham Upland Bird Study Group, has commented:-

“The abrupt loss of an otherwise reliable signal from this carefully tracked bird is of great concern. The original Northern Kites release project and later our colleagues in Friends of Red Kites have all worked tirelessly to establish a viable population of these magnificent birds in our region. Local success has brought pleasure, pride and enjoyment within the community but expansion of the breeding range is now overdue. The loss of this bird in suspicious circumstances, in the same area as other known persecution incidents of Red Kites, reflects an appalling situation and is surely indicative of how selfish criminal activity is holding back the population.”

From the moment that the Government announced the Covid – 19 lockdown Raptor Workers have been expressing concern that raptor persecution would increase significantly after we were, for understandable reasons, prevented from surveying and monitoring birds of prey. This is not an unreasonable fear, we saw a similar pattern in 2001 when access to the countryside was banned during the Foot and Mouth outbreak.

Is KK Covid – 19 collateral damage, or was this bird already destined to join the long line of birds that have ‘disappeared’ on grouse moors irrespective of the current pandemic?

The RSPB press release can be seen here [link]

If you have any information about this incident, please contact the Police on 101, quoting the reference number 22042020-0078., or,

Crimestoppers on 0800 555111.

Alternatively, if you have information about this case or of other birds of prey being killed or targeted you can call the RSPB’s confidential Raptor Crime Hotline on 0300 999 0101.

NERF

1 May 2020

 

RSPB Birdcrime Report 2018

The RSPB has today published the annual Birdcrime Report.

87 confirmed incidents of Raptor Persecution. As we well know the number of incidents that are discovered/recorded are just the tip of the iceberg as previous highlighted by the BASC Director of Communications Christopher Graffius in this publication from December 2017.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2018 was also the year that ‘Analysis of the Natural England’s data from satellite tagged Hen Harriers was published’

 

 

 

 

 

 

As well as the year that NERF Members in the Peak District were involved in a study of the catalogue of Raptor Persecution Incidents recorded in the Dark Peak alongside the disparity between breeding success of both Goshawk and Peregrine Falcon in the Dark Peak compared to the White Peak areas of the Peak District National Park. The report from the study can be read here

Natural England’s answer to the issue of illegal raptor persecution in our uplands was to implement their flawed policy of Hen Harrier brood management on the basis that it is essential for Hen Harrier conservation and will lead to an increase in the English population. That second assertion may be true during the breeding season, but it totally ignores the fact that all of the evidence reveals that persecution is more problematic after the chicks disperse from their breeding grounds and that it affects many more raptor species.

The Head of RSPB Investigations Mark Thomas speaking about the ongoing issues of raptor persecution can be found below

NERF’s response to Murgatroyd et al. Natural England’s paper identifying that the persecution of Hen Harriers on grouse moors is suppressing the population in Britain.

NERF welcomes the publication of the Murgatroyd et al paper, which highlights the fact that the pattern of the disappearances of satellite tagged Hen Harriers confirms beyond all doubt that there is widespread illegal killing of Hen Harriers on British grouse moors. Therefore the ‘it’s just a few bad apples’ defence, that we so often hear from the grouse shooting industry, is destroyed completely by science.

But how did we get to this point and why did it take so long? Will this be the catalyst that spurs the Government to say enough is enough, self-regulation has failed our natural heritage and actually take affirmative action, or will it be the beginning of further years and years of pointless procrastination and fudge?

‘Hen Harriers face extinction as a breeding species in England’.

That was the strap line of the Police led Operation Artemis, launched in 2004 to tackle Hen Harrier persecution across the UK. In a nutshell the Operation confirmed that the problem was that Hen Harriers were being systematically killed on grouse moors and sought to directly address the issue with members of the grouse shooting industry. A Police Officer, normally a Wildlife Crime Officer, personally delivered a proposed new code of conduct to every identified grouse moor owner, grouse moor land agent, grouse moor shooting tenant and grouse moor gamekeeper across the UK. Adherence to that code of practice would have brought an end to the vast majority of Hen Harrier persecution. Unfortunately that didn’t happen. The claim that Hen Harriers were facing extinction as a breeding species in England was derided by the grouse shooting industry, which refused en masse to cooperate, whilst claiming that self-regulation was the answer not Police or Government intervention.

Notwithstanding the lack of cooperation from the grouse shooting industry and the ever present threat of Police action, the time period that Operation Artemis was in force, 2004 – 2008, consistently delivered the highest number of breeding pairs and the highest number of fledged young dispersed over a wider geographical area in England than at any other time in the decade 2002 to 2012.

On the 6th January 2009 Natural England declared “There is compelling evidence that persecution continues, both during and following the breeding season. Persecution continues to limit Hen Harrier recovery in England”.

Natural England’s solution to the problem. It’s time to talk. It’s good to talk; isn’t it?

Hen Harriers were still being killed on grouse moors and we, the conservationists, were told that what was needed to resolve the problem was a partnership approach. It was claimed that the partnership approach would solve the ever present so called ‘conflict’ between Hen Harriers and driven grouse shooting. The ‘partnership cloud’ descended on the Hen Harrier persecution problem and any attempt at resolving the issue became instantly fog bound, embroiled in meaningless and pointless discussions for years. The Environment Council, a highly experienced group of negotiators who were used to handling complex conflict resolutions, were called in to set up the Hen Harrier Dialogue. Conflict resolution, that’s a cosy euphemism for dealing with organised criminality whilst not upsetting anyone in the partnership. NERF had a seat at that particular table and spent years listening to the denials, obfuscation and demands from the very industry that everyone in the room knew was largely responsible for the problem in the first place. Not one inch of ground was given by those representing the grouse shooting industry and in the end the very costly Hen Harrier Dialogue, paid for out of the public purse, failed miserably and was abandoned. It was doomed to fail from the outset but the conservationists had attended the meetings and tried to find a workable solution in good faith. Regrettably it was all for nought. Years were lost whilst the talking and the killing continued.

The Hen Harrier Dialogue clearly proved that it is ‘good to talk’; depending that is on which side of the argument you are on of course. Unfortunately the Hen Harriers were on the wrong side once again and the number of Hen Harriers killed illegally continued to rise.

Following the failure of the Hen Harrier Dialogue it was claimed yet again that what was needed was yet another partnership approach. Once more this would mean that all interested parties were working together to achieve a common goal. That would resolve the issue once and for all; wouldn’t it? As a consequence the ill-conceived Hen Harrier Plan swung in to force, however, whilst the grouse shooting industry was included, NERF was excluded from the discussions.

In 2009 the Partnership for Action Against Wildlife Crime – Raptor Persecution Priority Delivery Group [RPPDG] was formed. It was time to talk; again. The Group consisting of the Police, The Department of the Environment, Fisheries and Rural Affairs (DEFRA), Natural England, the Welsh Government, The Royal Society for the Protection of Birds (RSPB), The Northern England Raptor Forum (NERF) and the titans of the shooting industry representing the Moorland Association (MA), the National Gamekeepers Organisation (NGO), the Countryside Alliance (CA) and The British Association for Shooting and Conservation (BASC). The RPPDG, including the very same organisations that had stalled the Hen Harrier Dialogue, set off collectively in an accelerated bout of inaction. Theoretically the talking began afresh with the sole aim of ending raptor persecution in all its forms. Linked in pseudo-solidarity the Raptor Persecution Delivery Group marched in to the ‘partnership cloud’ once more; fog bound and going nowhere again. Olive branch after olive branch, concession after concession has been offered to the shooting industry representatives. Yet each and every positive proposal to date has been met with counter negative proposals designed with the sole aim of preventing any progress being made. At the same time several of the so called partners took every opportunity to attack the RSPB for assisting the Police to put professional criminals before the courts. In 2013 the prediction made by Operation Artemis in 2004 became a reality when the only two Hen Harrier breeding attempts in England failed.

The RSPB ‘Skydancer’ Project and the ongoing Hen Harrier Life Project, have for several years been highlighting the fact that Hen Harriers have been disappearing on or adjacent to moorland used for driven grouse shooting at an alarming rate.

Satellite tags which have catastrophically failed under inexplicable circumstances indicate that persecution is the most likely cause. The data has been dismissed as irrelevant by the grouse shooting industry for years. Rather than accept the reality they have constantly sought to divert attention from the fact that birds are being illegally killed on grouse moors by trying to lay the blame at the door of the tag manufacturers, RSPB staff, the Raptor Workers who fit the tags, bird watchers who allegedly disturb the birds and insufficient food supply.

All of these claims are ludicrous of course and they are disseminated for one purpose and one purpose alone – to divert attention away from the fact that the primary reason we have suppressed populations of Hen Harriers in the north of England is persecution of the species by members of the grouse shooting industry itself. This simple fact was accepted , without contest, by Natural England in the proceedings of the recent legal judgement on the challenge to Hen Harrier brood management trials– a plan in itself designed to allow yet another 5 years pass by whilst birds are persecuted.

So this is how we’ve arrived at where we are today and whilst some bird of prey populations are increasing the threat level for many others, including Hen Harriers, remains persistently high.

The RPPDG has been meeting for ten years and many tens of thousands of pounds have been squandered to deliver precisely nothing. Under the Chairmanship of Nick Lyall much is expected of the RPPDG in future and NERF remains committed to help to drive change forward. The number of conservation NGOs on the Group recently increased, at the moment we are collectively investing a tremendous amount of goodwill in the hope that progress will be forthcoming and the chairman is under tremendous pressure to deliver positive outcomes for all raptors not just Hen Harriers.

The sorry state of the Hen Harrier population and the root cause of the problem has been known for many years, probably decades. Now Murgatroyd et al provides the following stark, unequivocal evidence identifying the intensity of the persecution of Hen Harriers that exists on grouse moors. Their statement reads:

“We conclude that hen harriers in Britain suffer elevated levels of mortality on grouse moors, which is most likely the result of illegal killing.”

The authors of the report analysed satellite data from 58 Hen Harriers gathered over a 10 year period [2007 – 2017]. That is a very impressive amount of data to analyse and the conclusions, drawn from their analysis, are equally impressive. The authors need to be congratulated for their efforts in producing the paper. From their careful analysis of thousands of pieces of data they conclude that 72% of the 58 birds monitored, 42 individuals, were either confirmed killed [4 birds / 7%] whilst the remainder simply ‘disappeared’ when their tag inexplicably failed on grouse moors, predominantly in our protected landscapes.

Searches for those birds carried out with very sophisticated equipment by highly trained Natural England staff failed to locate either the bodies or the tags. This mirrors exactly the same pattern experienced by RSPB staff, evidenced by the number of unexplainable incidents where tags have catastrophically failed on or adjacent to grouse moors and neither the birds nor the tags were found after extensive searches were concluded.

What the paper doesn’t do, what it wasn’t tasked to do, is make a judgement about how many non-tagged Hen Harriers were killed over the same period in the same geographical areas. Whilst the exact number may never be known it is reasonable to assume that a great many birds were killed illegally in those same areas and for the same reasons that the satellite tagged birds were illegally killed. Whatever the true number of Hen Harriers illegally killed is, it will be certainly higher than the 42 individuals identified by this report.

This joint paper produced at the request of Natural England must be the last in a long line of wake up calls for the Government. Ministers need to publicly acknowledge that Hen Harriers have been and still are being systematically killed across the north of England by what can only be described as persistent organised crime.

There is absolutely no point in the Government pursuing flawed policies including the plan for brood management and the proposed southern re-introduction scheme. Both of these ‘experiments’ will achieve nothing more than putting Hen Harriers, perhaps more Hen Harriers than would normally be expected, at risk of being illegally killed on grouse moors. The Government’s own data speaks volumes to that effect.

NERF believes that the Government should, with immediate effect:

  • abandon the proposed southern re-introduction scheme
  • abandon the proposed brood management scheme
  • take steps to licence driven grouse shooting, with appropriate sanctions when licence breaches occur
  • divert the funding allocated to the southern re-introduction scheme and the brood management scheme to the National Wildlife Crime Unit in order that adequate resources can be deployed to tackle the root cause of Hen Harrier persecution, i.e. organised crime.

It has been 15 years since Operation Artemis was launched, 15 wasted years but this paper can and should be the catalyst for change. Your department produced the data analysed by Murgatroyd et al Mr Gove; it is time for you to take decisive, affirmative action now to stop Hen Harrier persecution on driven grouse moors. Don’t waste another 5 years on unnecessary experiments whilst wallowing in the current unacceptable status quo, repeating the errors of the past. We know what the problem is and we don’t need to watch the continued slaughter of Hen Harriers on grouse moors in protected landscapes by armed criminals just to confirm once more what we already know.

NERF

21 March 2019

The fire is extinguished as Vulcan joins the ‘disappeared’

When Hen Harrier ‘River’ joined the 2018 cohort that had ‘disappeared’ in suspicious circumstances the NERF article, published on 22 January 2019 ended:

Until the next time; and regrettably there will be a next time.

Knowing that there would be a ‘next time’ did not take away the pain felt when we learnt that yet another young Hen Harrier had joined the ‘disappeared’ in suspicious circumstances.

Little did we know when the article about River was written that Vulcan’s satellite tag had already suddenly and inexplicably stopped transmitting six days previously. Vulcan, one of five chicks from Northumberland, drifted south through the Peak District to Hampshire, spent time in Dorset before the tag finally sent out the last transmission from farmland, managed for pheasant and partridge shooting south of Calston Wellington, North Wiltshire.

Regrettably Wiltshire is no stranger to controversy where Hen Harriers are concerned. This is the county where Natural England propose to release circa 100 hen Harrier chicks, sourced from the Continent, over a 5-year period, as part of their southern reintroduction scheme. Natural England has always proclaimed that the area is a safe haven for reintroducing Hen Harriers – an essential condition for such reintroduction programmes, yet this new evidence would suggest that this is not the case. The fact that Vulcan has inexplicably ‘disappeared’ in an area approximately 10 kilometres to the north of the proposed release site is of great concern to our members.

NERF raptor workers are largely responsible for locating breeding attempts, monitoring the birds throughout the breeding season, ringing and satellite tagging the chicks in the North of England in partnership with RSPB.

Vulcan – in happier times
 

NERF has consistently opposed Natural England’s southern reintroduction scheme, which we believe is designed to divert attention away from the continuing tragedy of persecution of Hen Harriers, which remains the biggest threat to the species throughout England. Importing young birds and releasing them to face an uncertain future in the lowlands will not, in the opinion of NERF, be the panacea for Hen Harrier survival as a breeding species in England as envisaged by Natural England. The fate of Vulcan clearly demonstrates this. Nor will be a substitute for the demise due to persecution in upland areas. NERF urges Natural England to abandon the scheme and concentrate on resolving the primary problem of Hen Harrier persecution on land predominantly used for driven grouse shooting.

 

If you have any information that would aid the investigation please contact the authorities. There are several ways to pass on information; you can contact:

  • The Police on 101
  • Crimestoppers on 0800 555111
  • RSPB Investigation Team on 01767 680551
  • RSPB hotline on 0300 999 0101

NERF would like to thank the Forestry Commission, RSPB Life Project and Raptor Workers who watched over and protected Vulcan. You did a magnificent job and you should be proud of your efforts. NERF would also wish to thank Wiltshire Police and RSPB Investigations Team for their hard work investigating the disappearance of Vulcan.

 

 

NERF

10 March 2019